Daniel Browell enjoys a busy and varied performing career, having given recitals in the UK, Europe and North America since receiving acclaim in the national press for his London Southbank recital in the Purcell Room in 2006.  He gave his BBC Proms debut in 2008, as part of a composer portrait broadcast live on BBC Radio 3, and in 2009 he made his concerto debut at Manchester’s Bridgewater Hall.  In 2010 he returned to The Bridgewater Hall to give a solo recital as part of the Manchester Midday Concerts Society’s prestigious season.


Daniel particularly enjoys his collaborative projects with instrumentalists and singers; he has performed with YCAT winner Kathryn Rudge at the Wigmore Hall and on many occasions since, and he regularly works for the BBC Philharmonic. 


Daniel’s teaching experience varies from his work at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester, to Yorkshire Young Musicians at Leeds College of Music and Repton School in Derbyshire, amongst many others.


Daniel’s recent highlights include a cycle of Beethoven’s piano concerti with the Birmingham-based Eroica Camerata, and concerto performances in the Netherlands and Scotland with the Universities of Scotland Symphony Orchestra.  His future plans include the release of a CD of contemporary British composers, featuring the piano studies of Philip Venables, which he premiered at the Purcell Room.


                                                                                                                                                      

October 2014

'The other outstanding young artist heard was the pianist Daniel Browell, who gave the first performance of Philip Venables' intriguingly titled The Boy with the Moon in his Eyes, a set of four studies inspired by Debussy's études; far more than technical exercises, they gave rise to contrasting stylistic impressions created with delicacy and sensitivity by the pianist. He found even wider scope in André Tchaikovsky's Inventions, a set of 10, encapsulating the personalities of many of his musical friends, which drew finely judged and vividly pictorial playing from Browell, whom I shall look forward to hearing again.'


Musical Opinion March - April edition, 2007 - Margaret Davies



"Browell, playing from memory, gave what seemed an immaculate and thoroughly absorbed rendition."


Classical Source - Colin Anderson



"Pianist Daniel Browell premiered Philip Venables's The boy with the Moon in his Eyes, a volatile study of pianistic attack, timbre and sound decay. He impressed most in AndrÈ Tchaikowsky's Inventions (1962). Playing from memory (no mean feat), Browell characterised them with apparently nonchalant precision."


Evening Standard - Nick Kimberley



"Bella Tromba shared the evening with Daniel Browell, a pianist of

considerable intelligence and grace. He made much of Philip Venables'

elegant The Boy With the Moon in His Eyes, but was at his absolute best in AndrÈ Tchaikowsky's Inventions, a witty evocation of the composer's friends in the musical world."


The Guardian - Tim Ashley



"Browell displayed stamina and a deft touch in George Benjamin's desperately over-extended Fantasy on Iambic Rhythm and Philip Venables's new, Debussy-influenced preludes The Boy with the Moon in His Eyes. But he only really held the ear with a set of Inventions by the eccentric Polish pianist AndrÈ Tchaikovsky - each invention being a whimsical portrait of a friend."


The Times - Richard Morrison




"Another welcome musical discovery was the Variations by AndrÈ Tchaikovsky (no relation). It was good to hear a really weighty piece among a general diet of miniatures, and good to hear a young pianist - Daniel Browell - who could measure up to it."


The Telegraph - Ivan Hewett




"Daniel Browell, the solo pianist played a rather good new piece by Philip Venables, The boy with the moon in his eyes, and some George Benjamin with flair; energy and poetry. and 10 Inventions by Andre Tchaikowsky, with a variety of colour and wit."


The Independent - Keith Potter




Biography & Reviews

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